Supervised Visitation

When to Consider Supervised Visitation

Divorce typically takes its toll on more than just the spouses. If there are children from the marriage, the need to maintain as close a relationship with each parent is important. Most experts consider the opportunity for both parents to continue to have a strong presence in the children’s lives to be in the best interest of those children. Unless, of course, it isn’t. Whenever there are any concerns regarding a child’s safety or well-being while in the custody of one parent in particular, then it may be time to consider supervised visitation.

The general right to visitation

Ordinarily, the parent who has not been awarded custody of the child is entitled to visitation. The visitation arrangement is only limited by the court when it has been determined that unrestricted visitation might endanger the child physically, emotionally, or morally.

A court determination is required

Before the noncustodial parent’s right to visitation can be denied, or even limited, the court must conduct a hearing to determine what is in the best interest of the child. The noncustodial parent must be given notice of the proceedings so he or she can have an opportunity to be heard by the court. If it is determined that the non-custodial party is entitled to visitation, but there are concerns about health and/or safety issues, the court will often consider supervised or restricted visitation, meaning that the visits must take place in public or with a third-party present.

Common reasons for supervised visitation

While every family’s situation is unique and the concerns are varied, there are certain situations that typically result in restricted or supervised visitation. For instance, where there is a risk of emotional harm, visitation may be supervised in order to avoid an extremely upsetting situation for the child. Most often, this occurs when unusual behaviors indicate emotional problems arising from parental visits. Depending on the child’s age and maturity, courts may also consider the child’s desire to have supervised visitation.

Personal factors of a parent that may require supervised visitation

A parent that has a diagnosed mental illness does not automatically have limited rights to visitation; it may be restricted by the court if the condition at issue could potentially place the child at risk of harm. The same is true for parents who are known to abuse drugs or alcohol.

If you have questions regarding child visitation, or any other divorce issues, contact attorney Brad J. Latta online, or by calling (205) 401-1309.

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